Permalink

“Where do you see good design, Mr. Tinius?”

Inspired philosophers and still turns head to this day: Citroën DS, the goddess. Photo: Kraas & Lachmann, Tübingen

Inspired philosophers and still turns head to this day: Citroën DS, the goddess. Photo: Kraas & Lachmann, Tübingen

Nothing New on the Highway

If you drive the A8 Highway from Stuttgart to Munich on an average weekday, people who have nothing to do with design on a daily basis will make the following observation: from a distance of – let’s say – around 100 meters, you can very rarely correctly make out the vehicle brand and type from the silhouette alone. It’s easy to confuse a Lexus with a Mercedes, an Opel with a BMW, and a SEAT with a Peugeot. Admittedly, once in a while you see a 911 model approaching fast through the rearview mirror and there’s no mistaking it. Or, even better, you have the aesthetic pleasure of passing a goddess. Does that ring a bell? Citroën DS was the actual name of the model built between 1955 and 1975. The last of around 1.4 million vehicles rolled off the production line on April 24, 1975.

Unbelievably Different: the Déesse
The déesse – French for goddess – was so unbelievably different that French cultural philosopher Roland Barthes compared the vehicle with a Gothic cathedral in his famous essay The New Citroën (La nouvelle Citroën, 1957): “I mean the supreme creation of an era, conceived with passion by unknown artists, and consumed in image if not in usage by a whole population which appropriates them as a purely magical object.” (Source: FAZ.net., quote by Roland Barthes: Mythologies, Suhrkamp Taschenbuch 2012)

After all, have you ever heard a philosopher talk that way about the Astra, the BMW 7 Series, or the new Mercedes? In his article Fahr zur Hölle (the road to hell) in Süddeutsche Zeitung, which incidentally is worth a read, journalist Gerhard Matzig suggested in late 2015 that the automotive industry crisis is, first and foremost, of an aesthetic nature. Though it’s provocative, he proves his theory with interesting examples, in which he compares the MINI to a DOUBLE WHOPPER that suffers from obesity.

We spoke to industry designer Michael Tinius from BUSSE Design+Engineering in Ulm about design today. Tinius’s team received the Red Dot Design Award for the design of our Multigrind® CB grinding machine.

Michael Tinius, Head Designer at BUSSE Design+Engineering, Ulm

Michael Tinius, Head Designer at BUSSE Design+Engineering, Ulm

Schleifblog: Mr. Tinius, why don’t you begin by briefly explaining to our readers your responsibilities as Head Designer at BUSSE Design+Engineering, where the focus is primarily on designing industrial products, from lawn mowers to high-tech grinding centers.
Michael Tinius: In addition to the primary topics of company presentation and representation, as Head Designer I organize our Design department, plan capacities, and manage the projects in terms of quality, deadlines, and costs. But deep in my heart, I’ve always been a designer. I specify design strategies and development goals, develop formal content with the teams, and occasionally formulate the design down to the detail.

Is automotive design experiencing a crisis? Have we “quickly squandered the future-proof legacy of Bauhaus and Ulm School of Design” as Gerhard Matzig writes in Süddeutsche Zeitung? What goes through your mind when you drive along the highway and look at the cars?

The entire industry suffers from a monstrosity neurosis. If you ask me, cars are fundamentally evolving in the wrong direction. And I’m not only talking about design. It’s essential to ask what people actually need to get from A to B. A little more humility couldn’t hurt – not only from an environmental perspective. We need to again focus on the essentials, in part to unite the community of drivers. Those are strategy issues. I’m sure vehicle designers would be able to find answers beyond styling and image alone. To me, vehicle designs these days often seem over the top stylistically and too complex formally. With excessively dynamic lines and surfaces, the product loses all its seriousness.

How do things look in the manufacturing industry? For instance, does product design in machine construction enjoy the status it deserves also in terms of branding?
A lot has happened. In machine construction, they’ve learned that design is not cosmetic, but rather visualizes and emphasizes the qualities of the product. Solutions in heavy-machine construction almost seem architectural. There are some wonderful examples. The rules of brand design also apply to machine construction: design creates identity and thus promotes trust.

Inspiring and Inspired: a Conversation with Designer Michael Tinius

Inspiring and Inspired: a Conversation with Designer Michael Tinius

Shouldn’t future mechanical engineers also take a more in-depth look at good design and design history during their studies?
Not just engineers. Everyone should spend some time focusing on design phenomena. Products shape our world of consumption. Questioning and understanding them as well as their visual styles makes us more critical, capable, and autonomous. I also offer sketching and drafting seminars to engineers. In addition to learning and improving their own abilities to illustrate, the participants also find out how designers think and just how difficult it is to develop your own design ideas and transform them into a sketch. They usually leave the class more thoughtful.

Your colleague Dieter Rams once compared design with the trimming of a bonsai tree, speaking of design in a limited amount of space. What is your personal definition of design and who are your role models?
My role model is nature and its ability to optimize without compromise. Personally, I wouldn’t want to make big things smaller, but rather small things bigger, figuratively speaking. Designers are generalists. They shouldn’t feel confined, as they represent the point where everything comes together. They incorporate a whole host of faculties and unite the requirements of technology, manufacturing, ergonomics, and aesthetics. For me, the more interesting question is what design achieves and not what it is.

Multigrind® CB grinding machine, Haas’s design award winner and high-tech grinding center. Photo: Herbert Naujoks

Multigrind® CB grinding machine, Haas’s design award winner and high-tech grinding center. Photo: Herbert Naujoks

Where do you see good design today in industry or consumer goods? Are there any classic examples that you can still see today?
In my opinion, both areas have grown much closer together and even overlap. Our many small household goods often have an almost architectural structure and even a purist feel about them, while machines and large-scale equipment also demonstrate complex style characteristics in terms of shape and color. There’s something for everyone and everything is possible today. Good design allows you to experience functions and should trigger emotions and be inspiring. To this day, I still see Braun, Ingo Maurer, and iittala products as pleasantly straightforward and yet creative. They communicate formal continuity, even if in completely different ways.

And is there excessive design – when you think it just didn’t work and the designer went too far?
The relationship between appearance and reality is a matter of personal perspective. A walk through a furniture store or a lamp department can lead you through the depths of taste. If it’s the designers’ fault, I don’t know. I have the impression that there’s very little between upscale design brands and cheap suppliers.

What made you want to be a designer?
I’ve always wanted to design, regardless of what it is. The main attraction for me is the unknown and discovery, and not repetition. To put it boldly, each brand and each product is different. Providing objects with design and function and thus reaching other people are for me the best thing there is.

Where do you find the inspiration for your work and how important are ideas from other forms of art?
You’ll have an easier time harmonizing complex form structures if you try to fathom the polyphony of Bach’s music. Music is the greatest of all the arts, particularly in conjunction with movement and action, which is why I often go to concerts and the opera house or make music myself. Painting, sculpture, literature, and photography – I welcome anything that stimulates the senses.

One last question: Which book or text on the topic of design would you recommend to curious readers who haven’t studied design?
Lucius Burkhardt: Design Is Invisible.

Thank you for the conversation, Mr. Tinius.

Functional and aesthetic: access to the tool changer of the Multigrind® CB grinding machine. Photo: Herbert Naujoks

Functional and aesthetic: access to the tool changer of the Multigrind® CB grinding machine. Photo: Herbert Naujoks

Permalink

AMB 2016: Wie man Nachwuchsingenieure begeistert

Thomas Bader zeigt einem interessierten Nachwuchsingenieur unsere Schleifsoftware Horizon

Thomas Bader zeigt einem interessierten Nachwuchsingenieur unsere Schleifsoftware Horizon


Schleifsoftware statt Pokémons

Da sage noch jemand, die jungen Leute interessierten sich nur für League of Legends, Minecraft oder alberne Pokémons! Weit gefehlt, wie man am Samstag auf der AMB in Stuttgart am Haas-Stand sehen konnte. Man muss sich halt Zeit nehmen und wissen, wie man die kleinen Nachwuchsingenieure begeistert. Zum Beispiel mit beeindruckenden 3D-Darstellungen unserer Schleifsoftware Multigrind® Horizon.

Ihnen allen einen gute Woche!

Permalink

AMB 2016: Werkzeugschleifmaschine CU kommt an

Wie man sieht, ist Messe nicht nur anstrengend, sondern macht auch Spaß. Links Steffen Schmidt, daneben Eda Atici

Messe ist nicht nur anstrengend, sondern macht auch Spaß. Links Steffen Schmidt, daneben Eda Atici

Positives Zwischenfazit
Die AMB 2016 geht noch bis diesen Samstag, und wir ziehen mal ein kleines Zwischenfazit. Unsere Multigrind® Schleifmaschinen und unsere Schleifsoftware Multigrind® Horizon sind auch auf der Messe in Stuttgart echte Hingucker. Trotz der phasenweise treibhausartigen Temperaturen in den Messehallen sind wir sehr zufrieden mit dem Interesse der Besucherinnen und Besucher an unseren Maschinen und unserer Software.

Jochspannsystem für die Komplettbearbeitung von Werkzeugen

Vor allem unsere kompakte, flexible Werkzeugschleifmaschine CU stößt, wie schon auf der GrindTec im Frühjahr, auf großes Interesse der Fachleute. Daneben zeigen wir auf einer Schleifmaschine CA unser neu entwickeltes Jochspannsystem. Damit lassen sich Wendeschneidplatten ohne Bohrung sicher aufspannen und in einer Aufspannung komplett bearbeiten. Weitere technische Details dazu gibt’s demnächst hier im Schleifblog.

Das neue Jochspannsystem von Haas zur Komplettbearbeitung von Wendeschneidplatten ohne Bohrung

Das neue Jochspannsystem von Haas zur Komplettbearbeitung von Wendeschneidplatten ohne Bohrung

Hier noch ein paar Eindrücke von einer guten Messewoche

Über die technischen Vorzüge unserer Werkzeugschleifmaschine Multigrind ® CU könnte man stundenlang sprechen

Über die technischen Vorzüge unserer Werkzeugschleifmaschine Multigrind® CU kann man stundenlang sprechen

Ideal für ein ruhiges Gespräch im Messetrubel, die Horizon-Lounge bei Haas

Ideal für ein ruhiges Gespräch im Messetrubel, die Horizon-Lounge auf unserem Messestand

Klare Linie, kein Schnickschnack, ästhetisch ansprechend: unser Messestand auf der AMB 2016

Klare Linie, kein Schnickschnack, ästhetisch ansprechend: unser Messestand auf der AMB 2016

amb_stuttgart_2016_haas_schleifmaschinen_foto_kraas-lachmann_20160914_2v9a7607_nk

Immer freundlich und konzentriert, ob im persönlichen Gespräch oder am Telefon: unser Kollege Hongsheng Li, Chief Sales Officer China

Roger Barber vom britischen Fachmagazin Grinding & Surface Finishing im Gespräch mit Thomas Bader

Roger Barber vom britischen Fachmagazin Grinding & Surface Finishing im Gespräch mit Thomas Bader

Permalink

„Wo sehen Sie gutes Design, Herr Tinius?“

Inspirierte Philosphen und zieht immer noch Blicke auf sich: Citroën DS, die Göttin. Foto: Kraas & Lachmann, Tübingen

Inspirierte Philosophen und zieht immer noch Blicke auf sich: Citroën DS, die Göttin. Foto: Kraas & Lachmann, Tübingen

Nichts Neues auf der A8
Fährt man an einem normalen Wochentag auf der A8 von Stuttgart nach München, macht man als Mensch, der nicht täglich mit Designfragen befasst ist, die folgende Beobachtung: Ein Blick auf die Silhouette eines Autos aus einer Entfernung von, sagen wir mal knapp 100 Metern, reicht nur noch in den allerwenigsten Fällen, um sicher Marke und Fahrzeugtyp zu bestimmen. Leicht ist da ein Lexus mit einem Mercedes, ein Opel mit einem BMW, ein SEAT mit einem Peugeot verwechselt. Gut, hin und wieder rauscht ein 911er im Rückspiegel heran, dann gibt es kein Vertun. Oder, noch schöner, man hat das ästhetische Vergnügen, eine Göttin zu überholen. Sie erinnern sich? Citroën DS hieß das Modell korrekt, das von 1955 bis 1975 gebaut wurde. Am 24. April 1975 lief das letzte von gut 1,4 Millionen Fahrzeugen vom Band.

Unfassbar anders, die Déesse
Die Déesse (Französisch für Göttin) war so unfassbar anders, dass der französische Kulturphilosoph Roland Barthes in seinem berühmt gewordenen Aufsatz „Der neue Citroën“ (La nouvelle Citroën, 1957) dieses Automobil mit einer gotischen Kathedrale verglich: „Ich meine damit: eine große Schöpfung der Epoche, die mit Leidenschaft von unbekannten Künstlern erdacht wurde und die in ihrem Bild, wenn nicht überhaupt im Gebrauch von einem ganzen Volk benutzt wird, das sich in ihr ein magisches Objekt zurüstet und aneignet.“ (Quelle: FAZ.net., zitiert aus: Roland Barthes: Die Mythen des Alltags, Suhrkamp Taschenbuch 2012)

Tja, hat man schon mal solche Worte eines Philosophen über den Astra, den 7er oder die neue E-Klasse gehört? Der Journalist Gerhard Matzig hat Ende 2015 in der Süddeutschen in einem lesenswerten Artikel („Fahr zur Hölle“) die These aufgestellt, dass die Krise des Autos auch und vor allem die seiner Ästhetik sei. Das ist provokant, aber er belegt seine These mit schönen Beispielen, in dem er etwa den Mini mit einem an Adipositas erkrankten Doppelwhopper vergleicht.

Wir sprachen mit dem Industriedesigner Michael Tinius von Busse Design + Engineering aus Ulm über Design heute. Für die Gestaltung unserer Schleifmaschine Multigrind® CB wurde das Team von Tinius mit dem Red Dot Designpreis ausgezeichnet.

Michael Tinius, Chefdesigner bei Busse Design + Engineering, Ulm

Michael Tinius, Chefdesigner bei Busse Design + Engineering, Ulm

Schleifblog: Herr Tinius, erklären Sie unseren Lesern zum Einstieg bitte kurz Ihre Aufgaben als Chefdesigner von Busse Design+ Engineering, wo es ja hauptsächlich um die Gestaltung von Industrieprodukten geht: vom Rasenmäher bis zum Hightech-Schleifzentrum.

Michael Tinius: Neben übergeordneten Themen der Präsentation und Repräsentation des Unternehmens organisiere ich als Chefdesigner unsere Designabteilung, plane Kapazitäten und lenke fachlich die Projekte bezüglich Qualität, Termine und Kosten. Im Herzen bin ich aber immer Gestalter geblieben, gebe Gestaltungsstrategien und Entwicklungsziele vor, entwickle mit den Teams formale Inhalte und formuliere auch mal das Design bis in die Details aus.

Steckt das Automobildesign in einer Krise? Haben wir, wie Gerhard Matzig in der SZ schreibt, „das zukunftstaugliche Erbe von Bauhaus und Ulmer Schule schnell verschleudert“? Wie geht’s Ihnen, wenn Sie über die Autobahn fahren und sich die Autos anschauen?
Die ganze Branche leidet unter einer Neurose zur Monstrosität. Grundsätzlich entwickeln sich die Autos in meinen Augen in eine falsche Richtung. Damit meine ich nicht nur das Design. Die Frage muss erlaubt sein: was braucht der Mensch eigentlich, um von A nach B zu kommen? Mehr Bescheidenheit wäre wünschenswert, nicht nur aus ökologischer Sicht. Eine Rückbesinnung auf das Essenzielle ist notwendig, auch um die Gemeinschaft der Autofahrer wieder zusammenzuführen. Das sind Strategiefragen. Ich bin mir sicher, dass die Automobildesigner auch Antworten fänden, die außerhalb reiner Styling- und Imageabsichten liegen. Das aktuelle Automobildesign wirkt auf mich stilistisch oft überladen, formal zu komplex, mit der Überdynamisierung von Linien und Flächen verliert das Produkt seine Ernsthaftigkeit.

Wie sieht es in der produzierenden Industrie aus? Genießt das Produktdesign zum Beispiel im Maschinenbau den Stellenwert, der ihm gebührt, auch im Hinblick auf die Markenbildung?
Da hat sich viel getan. Der Maschinenbau hat gelernt, dass Design nicht Kosmetik ist, sondern die Qualitäten des Produkts visualisiert und herausstellt. Lösungen im Bereich des Großmaschinenbaus wirken fast schon architektonisch. Da gibt es wunderbare Beispiele. Die Regeln des Markendesigns gelten auch im Maschinenbau: Design schafft Identität und damit Vertrauen.

Begeisternd und begeistert, Designer Michael Tinius im Gespräch

Begeisternd und begeistert, Designer Michael Tinius im Gespräch

Sollten sich angehende Maschinenbauingenieure während ihrer Ausbildung nicht auch intensiver mit guter Gestaltung, Design und Designgeschichte befassen?
Nicht nur Ingenieure, jeder sollte sich mit Phänomenen der Gestaltung beschäftigen. Produkte prägen unsere Konsumwelt, sie zu hinterfragen und zu verstehen, auch bezüglich ihrer Formensprache, macht uns kritischer, kompetenter, autonomer. Ich gebe auch Skizzier- und Entwurfsseminare für Ingenieure. Neben dem Erlernen und Verbessern der eigenen Darstellungsfähigkeiten erfahren die Teilnehmer dabei auch, wie Designer denken, und wie schwierig es ist, eine eigene, gestalterische Vorstellung zu entwickeln und als Entwurf auszuarbeiten. Danach werden sie meist nachdenklicher…

Ihr Kollege Dieter Rams hat Design mal mit dem Beschneiden eines Bonsais verglichen, er sprach von Formgebung auf begrenztem Raum. Wie ist Ihre ganz persönliche Definition von Design, und welche Vorbilder würden Sie nennen?
Mein Vorbild ist die Natur und ihre Fähigkeit zur kompromisslosen Optimierung. Persönlich möchte ich nicht das Große beschneiden, sondern das Kleine groß machen, im übertragenen Sinne. Der Designer ist Generalist, er sollte sich nicht eingegrenzt fühlen, denn schließlich laufen bei ihm die Fäden zusammen. Er integriert die verschiedensten Fakultäten und fokussiert die Anforderungen aus Technik, Fertigung, Ergonomie und Ästhetik auf einen Punkt. Für mich ist die Frage spannender, was Design bewirkt und nicht was Design ist.

Schleifmaschine Multigrind® CB, Designpreisträgerin und Hightech-Schleifzentrum von Haas. Foto: Herbert Naujoks

Schleifmaschine Multigrind® CB, Designpreisträgerin und Hightech-Schleifzentrum von Haas. Foto: Herbert Naujoks

Wo sehen Sie heute gutes Design im Industrie- oder im Konsumgüterbereich? Gibt es Klassiker, die man immer noch anschauen kann?
Beide Bereiche haben sich meiner Meinung nach stark angenähert, beziehungsweise überlappen sich. Unsere vielen kleinen Helfer im Haushalt haben oft eine fast schon architektonische Gestaltungsstruktur und wirken puristisch, während Maschinen und Großgeräte in Form und Farbe auch mal komplexe Stilmerkmale aufweisen. Jeder Einstellungstyp wird bedient, heute ist alles möglich. Gutes Design macht Funktionen erlebbar, sollte Emotionen auslösen und positiv anregen. Produkte von Braun, Ingo Maurer und iittala wirken auf mich nach wie vor wohltuend sachlich, trotzdem kreativ und vermitteln formale Beständigkeit, wenn auch auf völlig unterschiedliche Weise.

Und gibt es Design-Auswüchse, wo Sie sagen, das ist daneben, da hat der Designer überzogen?
Die Relation zwischen Schein und Sein unterliegt der persönlichen Betrachtung. Der Gang durch ein Möbelhaus oder eine Leuchtenabteilung kann einen aber durch die Untiefen des Geschmacks führen. Ob die Designer daran schuld sind, weiß ich nicht. Hier habe ich den Eindruck, dass es zwischen elitären Designmarken und Billigheimern in der Fläche wenig gibt.

Was hat Sie dazu bewogen, den Beruf des Designers zu ergreifen?
Gestalten wollte ich schon immer, eigentlich egal was. Für mich liegt der große Reiz im Unbekannten, in der Entdeckung und nicht in der Wiederholung. Plakativ ausgedrückt: jede Marke, jedes Produkt ist anders. Dingen Gestalt und Funktion zu geben und damit andere Menschen zu erreichen, ist für mich etwas Großes.

Wo holen Sie sich die Inspiration für ihre Arbeit und wie wichtig sind Anregungen aus anderen Kunstformen?
Wer versucht, die Polyphonie der Bach’schen Musik zu ergründen, wird leichter Zugang finden, komplexe Formstrukturen zu harmonisieren. Die Musik ist die Höchste aller Künste, vor allem in Verbindung mit Bewegung und Handlung. Deshalb sitze ich oft im Konzert- oder Opernhaus, oder musiziere selbst. Malerei, Bildhauerei, Literatur, Fotografie, alles was die Sinne anregt, ist mir willkommen.

Letzte Frage: Welches Buch, welchen Text zum Thema Design empfehlen Sie interessierten Leserinnen und Lesern, die nicht Design studiert haben?
Lucius Burkhardt: Design ist unsichtbar.

Wir danken Ihnen für das Gespräch, Herr Tinius!

Funktional und ästhetisch: Zugang zum Werkzeugwechsler der Schleifmaschinen Multigrind® CB. Foto: Herbert Naujoks

Funktional und ästhetisch: Zugang zum Werkzeugwechsler der Schleifmaschine Multigrind® CB. Foto: Herbert Naujoks

Permalink

Präzision erzeugt Präzision: Stufenbohrer schleifen
Wie’s geht, zeigen wir Ihnen auf der AMB

Bearbeitungszeit erheblich reduziert

Stufenbohrer sind höchst effiziente und präzise Zerspa­nungswerkzeuge mit komplexen Geometrien. Eine Herausforderung für jede Schleifmaschine. Dank der durchdachten Kinematik der Multigrind® CU und der flexiblen Schleifsoftware Multigrind® Horizon lassen sich Stufenbohrer in nur einer Aufspannung inklusive Rundschleifen herstellen. Eine lupen­reine Komplettbearbeitung, die die Herstel­lungsdauer pro Werkzeug deutlich verkürzt.


Bearbeitung eines Stufenbohrers auf einer Multigrind® CU

Besuchen Sie uns auf der AMB

Welche Schleifaufgabe dürfen wir für Sie lösen? Welches Zerspanungswerkzeug wollen Sie herstellen? Lassen Sie uns auf der AMB 2016 darüber sprechen. Wir freuen uns auf Ihren Besuch vom 13. bis 17. September 2016 in Stuttgart, Halle 8, Stand B71.

Bis dahin und schleifen Sie gut!

Thomas Bader

Permalink

Precision creates precision: Spade drill grinding.
We’ll show you how at the AMB.

Significantly reduced processing time

Spade drills are highly efficient and precise machining tools with complex geometries. And a challenge for every grinding machine. Thanks to the sophisticated kinematics of the Multigrind® CU and the flexible Multigrind® Horizon grinding software, spade drills can be produced in one clamping, including cylindrical grinding. Flawless full-sequence machining that significantly cuts manufacturing time per tool.


Spade drill being machined on a Multigrind® CU

Visit us at the AMB

Which grinding challenge can we solve for you? Which machining tool would you like to manufacture? Let’s talk about it at the AMB 2016. We’re looking forward to seeing you between the 13th and 17th of September 2016 in Stuttgart, Germany, Hall 8, Booth B71.

See you there. Schleifen Sie gut!

Thomas Bader